Women and Creativity in Albuquerque is celebrating it's 10th anniversary. Womyns Work, The Apron Project and the Apronistas are pleased to be chosen one of the 10 for 10 and exhibit in the 2015 Women And Creativity. Watch this space for more details on where our life sized dolls will be on exhibit during the Month of March.

Womyns Work, The Apron Project

2014 Opening Reception Invitation

Installation site is the corner of 9th st. and Gold Ave SW in Downtown Albuquerque.

The opening reception is March 7th from 4-6 PM. There will be milk and cookies!

The 2013 Apron Project draped the iconic cottonwoods at the National Hispanic Cultural Center. You can see more photos at our Facebook Page. Our opening reception was Sunday, March 3 at 2 PM at the National Hispanic Cultrual Center (4th St. and Ceasar Chazev Bl) in Albuquerque. We had milk and cookies! We estimated that between 250-300 people came to the opening!

There are three videos, one of the opening and two with individual stills of each apron. They are posted above!

Can't wait until next year!

Aprons

Traditionaly, aprons represent a woman’s unpaid work, industriousness, nurturing, and her never-ending presence to comfort, create and care-take.  Now aprons are having a comeback.  A group of local Albuquerque artists  are using the medium of the apron to express themes from women’s lives, struggles and history. 

The Apron Project is an opportunity to create aprons that speak to our lives. The first exhibit of aprons was an outdoor installation in downtown Albuquerque, NM  during the month of March 2012 which is International Women’s month.  The success and excitement of this event has spurred us to begin planning a second annual Apron Project in March, 2013. 

Womyn’s Work is honored to be invited to install new aprons as part of Women and Creativity 2013 (WOMENANDCREATIVITY.ORG) at the National Hispanic Cultural Center  in Albuquerque NM. This is in conjunction with the exhibition of “Stitching Resistance: The History of Chilean Arpilleras” (http:www.nhccnm.org/).

Just imagine these magnificent cottonwoods wreathed in colorful aprons, wafting in the breeze!

There is more than one way to create an apron. This became apparent at the first installation.  Come and join The Apron Project in collaborative creativity, bring your ideas, learn about and contribute to the expression of important women’s statements, opinions and wisdoms. If you have no sewing skills, send us some of your artwork and we will attach it to an apron "blank".

If you would like to contribute an apron to this installation, snail mail information can be obtained by emailing weatherscf at yahoo dot com or jhquickbeam at msn dot com or you can click HERE and be taken to a submission document (BTW this takes you to the Creativity Continium site (the webmistress' web site!)

 

The History of  'APRONS'

I don't think our kids know what an apron is.

The principal use of Grandma's apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few. It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material.  But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven. It was wonderful for drying children's tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears. From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven. When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids. And when the weather was cold Grandma wrapped it around her arms. Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow bent over the hot wood stove. Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron. From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls. In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees. When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds. When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folk knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner. It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that 'old-time apron' that served so many purposes

REMEMBER: Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool.  Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw.  

They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

I don't think I ever caught anything from an apron - but love...

Womyns Work, the Apron Project is a work of inspiration originally planned and executed in three months beginning in January, 2012. The outdoor show was exhibited on a street corner lot in downtown Albuquerque NM for the Month of March 2012

Albuquerque celebrates Women's Month with a city-wide celebration and the three original planners were joined by other like-minded artists from both Albuquerque and the other states.

For the 2014 exhibit we are returning to our roots and will exhibit the aprons at the corner of Gold and 9th St. SW (our origial site...)

 If you wish to contribute an apron or make a monetary donation, you can contact  contact Womyns Work by emailing gquinn411 at gmail dot com for delivery details or click here to go to a submission form.

Video # 1 showing all the aprons in stills with the maker name and title

Video #2 with apron stills, maker name and title

Video of the opening reception, March 3, 2013 at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque NM

Goddess Tree, Goddess Statue and prayer flags

 If you would like to see photos of the 60 aprons we received, the pictures of the hanging and the opening reception (On one of the coldest nights of the 2012 winter, that is why we all have on hats, coats and then our aprons on the top!!)  click on this link

Womyns Work Apron Project

The History of 'APRONS'

I don't think our kids know what an apron is. The principle use of Grandma's apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few. It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material. But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children's tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids..

And when the weather was cold, Grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove.

Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folk knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that 'old-time apron' that served so many purposes.

Send this to those who would know (and love) the story about Grandma's aprons.

REMEMBER:

Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw.

They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

I don't think I ever caught anything from an apron - but love

Join us by making an apron for Womyns Work: The Apron Project 2014. Reply using the form above.